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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 250-255

Ocular involvements, its complications, visual outcome, and treatment response of herpes zoster ophthalmicus: Review of 35 patients from Andaman and Nicobar Island


1 Department of Ophthalmology, MS Ophthalmology, Andaman and Nicobar Islands Institution of Medical Science, Port Blair, Andaman and Nicobar, India
2 Department of Dermatology, Andaman and Nicobar Islands Institution of Medical Science, Port Blair, Andaman and Nicobar, India

Correspondence Address:
Sujit Das
Department of Ophthalmology, Andaman and Nicobar Islands Institution of Medical Science, Port Blair - 744 104, Andaman and Nicobar
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_87_18

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Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the ocular involvements, its complications, visual outcome, and treatment response of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO). Design: This was an observational and retrospective study. Methods: All clinically diagnosed cases were included in the study. All were subjected to corneal staining, corneal sensation, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure, and fundus examination. All were treated with oral acyclovir (800 mg) 1 tablet 5 times a day for 5 days along with tablet pregabalin (150 mg twice/day) and neurobion forte (1 tablet/day). Acyclovir eye ointment was given 5 times a day for 14 days with antibiotic and cycloplegic drops. Mean follow-up was 12 months. Results: Mean age of presentation was 51–55 years (40%) with male predominance (88.6%). Unilateral eye involvement was 32 (91.4%) and bilateral was three (8.6%). Blepharitis was (80%) the most common ocular involvement followed by punctuate keratitis (77.1). Ocular complications were neurotrophic keratopathy (5.7%), corneal opacity (5.7%), and postherpetic neuralgia (62.9%). Mean BCVA was 20/20 in 33 eyes (94.3%). The sensitivity of acyclovir was found 100%. Conclusion: Rapid diagnosis and early institution of antiviral therapy are necessary to prevent ocular morbidity. History of chickenpox, low immunity, and environmental factors (hot climate, humidity, and rainfall,) greatly influences the occurrence of HZO. The overall visual outcome is good with early institution of antiviral therapy.


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