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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 495-502

Prevalence of stress and its relation to different precipitating factors among urban females of reproductive age group in Burdwan, India


1 Department of Physiology, Rampurhat Government Medical College and Hospital, Rampurhat, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Calcutta Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Arunima Chaudhuri
Department of Physiology, Rampurhat Government Medical College and Hospital, Rampurhat, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_232_18

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Background: Women in emerging economic and social markets are more stressed than those in developed countries. Aims: We aimed to study the prevalence of stress and its relation to different precipitating factors among urban females of reproductive age group. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care center of West Bengal after taking institutional ethical clearance and informed consent of the participants. A sample of 7500 women was selected after proper randomization using an online randomizer. On the first appointment, history of the participants was carefully taken, pulse and blood pressure were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) and waist/hip (W/H) ratio were measured. Parameters assessed were Presumptive Stressful Life Events Scale (PSLES) scores and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) scores. Results: Among 7500 participants, 3245 (43.27%) had mild-to-moderate stress and 4255 (56.73%) had severe stress. Mean ± standard deviation value of PSLES score of participants recruited for the study was 237.99 ± 79.45, and PSS score was 23.76 ± 5.24; there was a positive correlation between PSLES scores and PSS scores with r = 0.8. There was no significant difference in age between the two groups (22.8 ± 3.22 vs. 22.64 ± 3.15; P= 0.26). There was a significant difference in PSLES scores between the two groups (312.93 ± 27.19 vs. 162.99 ± 25.63; P < 0.001). There was a significant difference in values of PSS scores, BMI, W/H ratio, and pulse rate between the two groups. Marital conflicts, family conflict, and conflict with laws were the highest percentages of problems reported by these groups of participants as cause of stress. Conclusions: We observed that 100% of our participants were stressed, and family conflict, marital conflict, problems with in-laws, and abuse by husbands were some of the main contributors of stress in the population studied. Stress levels are increasing in females and require early intervention. To address gender disparities in mental health, multiple actions need to be implemented at various levels. In particular, national mental health policies must be developed that are based on an explicit analysis of gender disparities in risk and outcome.


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