Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
Print this page Email this page Users Online: 1
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 30-36

A study of correlation of perceived stress and thyroid function among females in a rural population of reproductive age group


1 Department of Physiology, Rampurhat Government Medical College and Hospital, Rampurhat, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine and Sagore Dutta Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Samarjit Koner
Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine and Sagore Dutta Hospital, Kamarhati, Kolkata - 700 054, West Bengal
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_219_18

Rights and Permissions

Background: Thyroid dysfunction may be associated with increased perceived stress. Aims: We aimed to study the correlation of perceived stress and thyroid function among females in a rural population of reproductive age group. Materials and Methods: This pilot study was conducted in Burdwan Medical College on 200 newly diagnosed female hypothyroid patients in a period of 12 months after taking institutional ethical clearance and informed consent of the participants. Parameters studied were body mass index (BMI), Presumptive Stressful Life Event Stress Scale (PSLES) scores, Perceived Stress Scale scores (PSS scores), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and free thyroxine (fT4) levels. To avoid stress effects of the premenstrual phase, we examined our participants during the postmenstrual phase. All the participants were on nonvegetarian diet and their dietary habits were nearly similar. Participants were divided into two groups: G1 – hypothyroid patients and G2 – patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. The computer software “Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 (SPSS Inc., Released 2007. SPSS for Windows, version 16.0. SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA)” was used to analyze the data. Results: Two hundred newly diagnosed hypothyroid females were included in the present study. Among them, 130 were clinical hypothyroid (G1) and 70 were subclinical hypothyroid patients (G2). A significant difference was found between clinical and subclinical hypothyroid females for mean PSS scores (P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in PSLES scores between the two groups. A significant difference was found between clinical and subclinical hypothyroid females for BMI (P = 0.002), TSH (P < 0.0001), and fT4 (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in age between the two groups. There was a significant positive correlation between PSS scores and TSH levels with r value of 0.97 in G1 and r value of 0.26 in G2, respectively. Conclusion: Females of reproductive age group with clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism faced the same amount of stressful life events. However, their perception of stress was significantly different. High TSH was positively correlated with high score on PSS. Clinical hypothyroidism is associated with hypercortisolemia and also depression. However, a cause–effect relation is yet to be established. Moreover, depression and serum cortisol were not assessed, so no further conclusions can be drawn from the present study.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1023    
    Printed56    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded126    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal