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EDITORIAL
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 3-4  

Understanding transdisciplinary level of integration in medical education


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication16-Dec-2019

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_20_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Understanding transdisciplinary level of integration in medical education. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth 2020;13:3-4

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Understanding transdisciplinary level of integration in medical education. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jan 23];13:3-4. Available from: http://www.mjdrdypv.org/text.asp?2020/13/1/3/272878



Transdisciplinary integration is learner centered and enables the learner to construct meaning from the integrated learning experience.[1],[2] It has been identified as one of the very effective tools to enhance the understanding and empower the medical students with the critical skills required for developing a good doctor.[1],[2],[3] Owing to the multiple benefits associated with the same, it has been adopted across different nations, and now, similar words have been voiced out for an Indian Medical Graduate.[3],[4] The formal introduction of integrated teaching within the curriculum is a welcome step and we will be definitely seeing its benefit among the future generation of doctors.[4]

Harden's integration ladder is the baseline document which has suggested sequential steps in the development of an integrated curriculum.[5] A total of 11 levels have been defined, starting from Level 1 and 2 (indicates nonintegration), followed by Level 3, 4, and 5 (indicates early integration efforts), and then, Level 6, 7, and 8 (refers to cooperative integration), and finally, Level 9, 10, and 11 (signifies collaborative integration).[5]

This ladder precisely explains the progressive nature of integration from one step to the next, wherein there is no integration at the Level 1, and as the level increases, integration also increases. Thus, from the initial stage, wherein each individual subject retains their identity, as we move up the ladder, eventually the subjects lose their identity and there are no subject boundaries.[5] In addition, the ladder helps the curriculum planners to ascertain the extent of integration in their curriculum and even gives them appropriate guidance to progress up the ladder.[5],[6]

The transdisciplinary integration can be planned even in the undergraduate medical education, but it requires extensive lesson planning and support from the individual departments.[3],[6] This can be easily explained through an example of abdominal pain as mentioned in [Table 1].[1],[2],[3],[4],[5],[6],[7],[8] However, to ensure deep learning, the students should have in-depth knowledge about various differential diagnoses of abdominal pain (quadrant wise) and the manner in which each of these patients' will present to the hospital.
Table 1: Understanding transdisciplinary integration through abdominal pain

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Transdisciplinary approach helps the students to acquire the desired skills which are a must for performing clinical examination. Likewise, it also plays an important role in the strengthening of the affective component, which empowers the student to be more competent in dealing with the anxiety and sufferings of patients and their family members. Obviously, the quality of learning is much better, as the students/involved health professionals gets a chance to apply their theoretical knowledge in authentic settings.[1],[2],[7],[8] The transdisciplinary integration will expose the students to a vast number of learning opportunities and acquisition of skills, whether it is critical thinking or clinical reasoning or problem-solving or visualizing the bigger picture.[6],[7],[8]

In conclusion, the teaching imparted to the students at transdisciplinary levels is expected to significantly aid the students to have a focused approach in patient management. The adoption of a transdisciplinary approach will significantly reduce the sufferings of patients and also minimize the financial burden on family members and load on the health-care delivery system.



 
  References Top

1.
Lai SH, Tsoi T, Tang CT, Hui RJ, Tan KK, Yeo YW, et al. An integrated, collaborative healthcare model for the early diagnosis and management of dementia: Preliminary audit results from the first transdisciplinary service integrating family medicine and geriatric psychiatry services to the heart of patients' homes. BMC Psychiatry 2019;19:61.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Treffry-Goatley A, Lessells RJ, Moletsane R, de Oliveira T, Gaede B. Community engagement with HIV drug adherence in rural South Africa: A transdisciplinary approach. Med Humanit 2018;44:239-46.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Ambwani S, Vegada B, Sidhu R, Charan J. Impact of integrated teaching sessions for comprehensive learning and rational pharmacotherapeutics for medical undergraduates. Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2017;7:S57-S61.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Medical Council of India. Competency Based Under Graduate Curriculum; 2018. Available from: https://old.mciindia.org/InformationDesk/ForColleges/UGCurriculum.aspx. [Last accessed on 2019 Jan 17].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Harden RM. The integration ladder: A tool for curriculum planning and evaluation. Med Educ 2000;34:551-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Senior E, Telford M. Using an integrated teaching and learning approach to deliver inter-professional practice in public health. Nurse Educ Today 2015;35:1013-5.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Ulrich CM, Gigic B, Böhm J, Ose J, Viskochil R, Schneider M, et al. The ColoCare study: A paradigm of transdisciplinary science in colorectal cancer outcomes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2019;28:591-601.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Lawlor EF, Kreuter MW, Sebert-Kuhlmann AK, McBride TD. Methodological innovations in public health education: Transdisciplinary problem solving. Am J Public Health 2015;105 Suppl 1:S99-S103.  Back to cited text no. 8
    



 
 
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