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VIEWPOINT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 104-105

Structured framework for teaching professionalism to medical students


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu - 603 108
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_299_19

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Professionalism among medical students has been identified as one of the core competencies expected of a medical graduate. Acknowledging the need to teach professionalism, the formulation of a formal curriculum is a must. The drafted curriculum should extend across all the professional year, including internship and should specify the topics to be covered in each professional year, hours of teaching, teaching-learning method and the preferable mode of assessment. However, considering the basic fact that professionalism is more of an attitudinal change, it is vital to accept that formal curriculum will provide a structural framework, but for the better outcomes, it has to be supported by informal teaching. In conclusion, professionalism is an integral component in the development of a medical practitioner and the need of the hour is to resort to a combined formal-informal mode of teaching so that medical students are benefitted in the long run.


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