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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 465-469

Extranodal tuberculosis of the head and neck: Our experiences at a tertiary care teaching hospital of East India


1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, IMS and SUM Hospital, Siksha 'O' Anusandhan University (Deemed to be), Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Medical Research Laboratory, IMS and SUM Hospital, Siksha 'O' Anusandhan University (Deemed to be), Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
3 Division of Microbiology, ICMR-National Institute of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Santosh Kumar Swain
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, IMS and SUM Hospital, Siksha 'O' Anusandhan University (Deemed to be), Bhubaneswar, Odisha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_168_19

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Introduction: Extranodal tuberculosis of the head-and-neck area is a rare clinical entity and constitutes a less common type of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It often creates challenges among head-and-neck physicians for its diagnosis and treatment. Objective: The aim of the study is to discuss the clinical presentations, diagnostic challenges, and treatment of extranodal tuberculosis of the head-and-neck area. Materials and Methods: There are 22 patients of extranodal locations of tuberculosis in the head-and-neck region managed at our teaching hospital between December 2014 and January 2019. Results: The sinonasal tract affected in 5 cases, the tonsils in 4 cases, the middle ear cleft in 4 cases, the nasopharynx in 3 cases, and the larynx in 3 cases. The parotid gland affected with tuberculosis in 2 cases and 1 case in the thyroid gland. The clinical presentations, imaging, and endoscopic pictures are not specific, whereas the diagnosis is based on histopathological examination. All the patients treated with antitubercular therapy. All patients showed favorable results after 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: Extranodal tuberculosis is a rare clinical entity and has no specific clinical features. It is often a differential diagnosis of head-and-neck malignancies and chronic infective or noninfective ulcers. Early diagnosis and its treatment may avoid complications and needless major surgery.


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