Medical Journal of Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth

EDITORIAL
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 298--299

Multisource feedback: Anticipated barriers and the potential solutions during its planning and implementation


Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava1, Prateek Saurabh Shrivastava2,  
1 Department of Community Medicine, Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu
India




How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Multisource feedback: Anticipated barriers and the potential solutions during its planning and implementation.Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth 2020;13:298-299


How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Multisource feedback: Anticipated barriers and the potential solutions during its planning and implementation. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Aug 13 ];13:298-299
Available from: http://www.mjdrdypv.org/text.asp?2020/13/4/298/290180


Full Text



The ultimate goal of medical education is to produce a competent health-care personnel and meet the health-related needs of the general population.[1] The adoption of competency-based medical education across all the medical colleges is the right approach to attain the goal.[2] In fact, assessment becomes an indispensable aspect of this entire process as it gives an indication of the professional growth and learning.[1],[2] However, with regard to the assessment, the choice of the assessment tool is quite important, as the employed method should meet the criteria of being valid, reliable, feasible, and acceptable and should have a significant educational impact.[1]

In fact, adoption of a sound assessment method will depict the strengths and weaknesses of the students and aid in the development of a shared plan for bridging the existing shortcomings.[1],[2] Considering the fact that a medical undergraduate student should not only be sound with medical knowledge but also be competent in patient care, demonstrate leadership qualities, become a lifelong learner, and should be a professional, the employed assessment tool should assess all these domains.[1],[2],[3] Nevertheless, it is quite obvious that a single assessment tool cannot measure all these attributes of a learner, and a combination of methods (workplace-based assessment) have to be used.[1],[2]

Multisource feedback (MSF) is an effective, reliable, and valid method of assessment in which different stakeholders (viz., peers, teachers, patients, relatives, and nursing staff) simultaneously observe (direct observation) and rate the performance of the student in action.[2],[3],[4] The method aids in the assessment of different domains such as clinical care, communication skills, and professionalism, and the feedback is given to the students about their performance.[3] MSF can be obtained through mini-peer assessment tool, usually twice in a year and it supplements other assessment methods.[2],[3],[4]

The method enables the assessment of history taking, clinical examination, critical thinking (for reaching a diagnosis), clinical reasoning (for deciding a management plan), communication skills, leadership and working within a team, managerial skills, and professionalism.[2],[3] The assessment can be done using a rating scale, and the performance of the student can be graded based on the framed and validated rubrics of milestones.[5] However, the process of planning and implementation is often associated with different challenges and should be dealt systematically [Table 1].[1],[2],[3],[4],[5]{Table 1}

In conclusion, MSF is an extremely effective way of formative assessment and does the assessment for learning. However, the implementation of the same comes with lots of challenges and thus requires a planned approach with extensive support from the faculty members.

References

1Humphrey-Murto S, Wood TJ, Ross S, Tavares W, Kvern B, Sidhu R, et al. Assessment pearls for competency-based medical education. J Grad Med Educ 2017;9:688-91.
2Moonen-van Loon JM, Overeem K, Govaerts MJ, Verhoeven BH, van der Vleuten CP, Driessen EW. The reliability of multisource feedback in competency-based assessment programs: The effects of multiple occasions and assessor groups. Acad Med 2015;90:1093-9.
3Probyn L, Lang C, Tomlinson G, Bandiera G. Multisource feedback and self-assessment of the communicator, collaborator, and professional CanMEDS roles for diagnostic radiology residents. Can Assoc Radiol J 2014;65:379-84.
4Jong M, Elliott N, Nguyen M, Goyke T, Johnson S, Cook M, et al. Assessment of emergency medicine resident performance in an adult simulation using a multisource feedback approach. West J Emerg Med 2019;20:64-70.
5Stevens S, Read J, Baines R, Chatterjee A, Archer J. Validation of multisource feedback in assessing medical performance: A systematic review. J Contin Educ Health Prof 2018;38:262-8.