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GUEST EDITORIAL
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 253-254  

Justifying the use of balanced scorecard in medical colleges to enhance teaching, research, and patient care-related activities


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission01-Mar-2019
Date of Decision25-Apr-2019
Date of Acceptance09-Aug-2019
Date of Web Publication25-Feb-2021

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu District, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_74_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Justifying the use of balanced scorecard in medical colleges to enhance teaching, research, and patient care-related activities. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth 2021;14:253-4

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Justifying the use of balanced scorecard in medical colleges to enhance teaching, research, and patient care-related activities. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 May 13];14:253-4. Available from: https://www.mjdrdypv.org/text.asp?2021/14/3/253/309955



Medical colleges are usually multitasking, and they are supposed to fulfill their role in three major dimensions, namely patient care, teaching, and research.[1],[2] However, this in itself is a really complex task for them as patient care has to be delivered on an urgent and prompt basis, while teaching (for training and transforming a budding student into a competent health professional) extends for an intermediate period, and finally the research component, which usually requires long duration.[2],[3] In addition, the fulfillment of all the three roles requires significant financial support and investment, which is much higher than that required for managing a hospital with no research/teaching component.[1],[2]

Now, the question arises, how to effectively carry out these three roles of a medical college and at the same time ensure that the overall performance remains optimal in the respective domains.[2] Performance evaluation remains an integral aspect of quality control in all the settings, and different tools have been used in heterogeneous settings, and each one of them has employed different indices for the same. The balanced scorecard (BSC) has emerged as a reliable answer to this complex problem and can be effectively used to maintain a balance between the three major roles which are supposed to be executed by a medical college.[2],[3],[4] For more than two decades, BSC has found its utility in different fields of business and industry and played a major role in the optimal management of different organizations.[1],[3],[4],[5] Because even the medical colleges are now more like industry, even in the health sector, BSC can be definitely employed as it not only goes beyond the usual parameters (financial aspect) but even aids in the development of a multidimensional framework to eventually enhance effectiveness of the health care facilities.[1],[4],[5]

A BSC is generally designed with an aim to bring about an alignment between the vision, mission, objectives, and strategy and thus enables the progress of the institution.[3],[4] In other words, it helps in the translation of the mission and strategy of an organization into measurable performance indices.[1],[5] Furthermore, it not only assists in the assessment of the past event but also aids in predicting the future performance in different dimensions of a medical college (viz., at the end of 3 years, the number of publications or bed-occupancy ratio or number of undergraduate students clearing entrance examinations for postgraduation course).[2],[3],[4]

At Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, a constituent college of Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Puducherry, we have sensitized the faculty members about the BSC and even started the process of designing of a comprehensive BSC. It has been planned to use the same not only for evaluating the performance of an individual but also for the career advancement, academic promotion, and increments. The formulation of the BSC for a medical college requires consideration of the views of different stakeholders and then for each of the stakeholders; specific performance indicators are also framed.[2] It usually takes into account five dimensions, namely internal stakeholders (such as faculty members and staff), external stakeholders (such as students, parents, and patients), innovation/growth perspective (such as adoption of skill curriculum or cadaveric laboratory or palliative care), financial/resources perspective (such as increasing hospital revenue, proper budgeting, and staff retention), and finally the internal processes (viz., standard operating procedures for any task).[2],[4],[5] The designed BSC should include views from each of the involved stakeholders, and a consensus should be achieved before it is implemented.[1] In addition, there is an immense need to keep modifying the same as the time passes by to ensure that the medical college keeps progressing in all three mandatory roles assigned to them.[1],[2]

In conclusion, BSC is a wonderful tool for the measurement of performance of the staff members of a medical college, and at the same time, it ensures a specific level of accountability from all the involved stakeholders.



 
  References Top

1.
Behrouzi F, Shaharoun AM, Ma'aram A. Applications of the balanced scorecard for strategic management and performance measurement in the health sector. Aust Health Rev 2014;38:208-17.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Trotta A, Cardamone E, Cavallaro G, Mauro M. Applying the balanced scorecard approach in teaching hospitals: A literature review and conceptual framework. Int J Health Plann Manage 2013;28:181-201.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Leyton-Pavez CE, Huerta-Riveros PC, Paúl-Espinoza IR. Balanced scorecard in health. Salud Publica Me×2015;57:234-41.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Maurer MH, Teichgräber U, Kröncke TJ, Hamm B, Lemke AJ. The balanced scorecard – Applications in a radiology department. Rofo 2012;184:1118-25.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Bouland DL, Fink E, Fontanesi J. Introduction of the balanced scorecard into an academic department of medicine: Creating a road map to success. J Med Pract Manage 2011;26:331-5.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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