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Encouraging assessment and collection of feedback in interactive teaching sessions: A medical teacher's perspective


1 Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth - Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth - Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission30-Sep-2019
Date of Decision26-Jan-2020
Date of Acceptance11-Mar-2020

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava,
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical, College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV)-Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu - 603108
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_271_19

  Abstract 


The best way to deliver effective medical education in large or small group teaching sessions is by ensuring that the sessions are interactive and interesting for the students so that they actively participate in the sessions. However, it is important to acknowledge that a teacher has to do a proper preinstructional planning for this to happen. A teacher has to specify the specific learning objectives of their session and convey the students what they expect students to take away from the session. At the same time, the teacher has to carefully decide on the method of assessment during the interactive session, as the selected method should drive learning, easy to administer, and should not extend the overall duration of the session. The assessment method can target any of the domains of learning depending on the nature of the topic and should aim to test different levels of learning in each domain. In conclusion, assessment and feedback play an instrumental role in the entire process of teaching–learning. Thus, it has to be encouraged as it offers a wide spectrum of benefits to the students as well as the teachers.

Keywords: Assessment, feedback, interactive teaching, medical education



How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Encouraging assessment and collection of feedback in interactive teaching sessions: A medical teacher's perspective. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth [Epub ahead of print] [cited 2021 Aug 4]. Available from: https://www.mjdrdypv.org/preprintarticle.asp?id=310586




  Introduction Top


The best way to deliver effective medical education in large or small group teaching sessions is by ensuring that the sessions are interactive and interesting for the students so that they actively participate in the sessions. However, it is important to acknowledge that a teacher has to do a proper pre-instructional planning for this to happen. In other words, the teacher has to decide whether the assessment for learning will be done or not and using which method feedback will be obtained from the students.[1],[2] This essentially will require more efforts from the teachers' community, but it will simultaneously aid in their own professional development.[1]

Assessment of an interactive teaching session

It is a wellknown fact that assessment derives learning, and thus, keeping an assessment during the session will significantly enhance the involvement and participation of the students.[1] During an interactive teaching session, the assessment can be considered to have high stakes (where students respond correctly and get the full credit) or low stakes (where the answers may not be correct, but the student gets some credit owing to their participation). It is worth noting that in general, high-stake assessment refers to summative assessment, while low-stake assessment is generally formative assessments. However, it is quite certain that regardless of the response, all the students receive constructive feedback. It is pretty much obvious that the results of assessment depend on the extent of learning, which is directly determined by the quality of teaching.[1],[2],[3]

Role of Teachers

A teacher has to specify the specific learning objectives of their session and convey the students what they expect students to take away from the session. At the same time, the teacher has to carefully decide on the method of assessment during the interactive session, as the selected method should drive learning, easy to administer, and should not extend the overall duration of the session.[3] The assessment method can target any of the domains of learning depending on the nature of the topic and should aim to test different levels of learning (should not restrict only with the recall level in cognitive domain) in each domain.[1],[3]

Collection of feedback in an interactive teaching session

The next step is to obtain a feedback from students about their learning.[4] Even though feedback has been recognized as an important dimension of teaching– learning process, its impact in medical education has been suboptimal. [2,4] This is primarily because till date, emphasis has given that teachers should give feedback to students to improve their learning, while the other dimension (students giving feedback to improve their teaching) has been ignored.[4] The feedback component in interactive teaching sessions can be utilized to assess learning among students as well as the quality of teaching.[5] On a similar note, the involvement of other stakeholders (such as peers, patients, patients relatives, nursing staff, etc.) can also be sought for teaching– learning sessions planned in hospital settings. In Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute and Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Constituent Units of Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Puducherry, the process of obtaining feedback from students for each of the teaching session and also multi-source feedback has been envisaged.

This process of obtaining feedback encourages prompt responses from students and enables an immediate response from teachers.[1] Based on the feedback, the teacher gets an opportunity to understand the needs of the students and can modify the session delivery, especially if the major proportion of students report about it. Once again, any of the available methods can be employed to obtain feedback from the students; nevertheless, preference should be given to those methods which are easy to analyze and response can be made available soon.[4],[5]


  Conclusion Top


In conclusion, assessment and feedback play an instrumental role in the entire process of teachinglearning. Thus, it has to be encouraged as it offers a wide spectrum of benefits to the students as well as the teachers

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Tavakol M, Dennick R. The foundations of measurement and assessment in medical education. Med Teach 2017;39:1010-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Role of feedback in the feed-forward of undergraduate medical students. Res Dev Med Educ 2018;7:62-3.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Ismail MA, Ahmad A, Mohammad JA, Fakri NM, Nor MZ, Pa MN. Using Kahoot! as a formative assessment tool in medical education: A phenomenological study. BMC Med Educ 2019;19:230.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Ho K, Gingerich A, Shen N, Voyer S, Weerasinghe C, Snadden D. Remote hands-on interactive medical education: Video feedback for medical students. Med Educ 2011;45:522-3.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Feedback role in enhancing the professional growth of the medical student and the teacher. Libyan Int Med Univ J 2018;3:70-1.  Back to cited text no. 5
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