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A study of perceived stress, burnout, and job satisfaction of doctors and nonmedical staff in a medical college of West Bengal during COVID-19 pandemic


1 Departments of Physiology, Burdwan Medical College, Bardhaman, West Bengal, India
2 Departments of Pharmacology, Burdwan Medical College, Bardhaman, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Community Medicine, Medical College Kolkata, West Bengal, India
4 Department of Physiology, Lady Hardinge Medical College, Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Arunima Chaudhuri,
Department of Physiology, Burdwan Medical College, Burdwan, Kolkata, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_414_20

Background: The COVID-19 crisis has placed additional pressure on doctors and the health-care system in general, and the research shows that extra pressure brings a greater risk of psychological distress. Aims: To study perceived stress levels, burnout, and job satisfaction of doctors and non-medical staff in a medical college of West Bengal during COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was carried out on 105 doctors (Group A) and 64 non-medical staff (Group B) in Burdwan Medical College after taking institutional ethical clearance and informed consent of the subjects. An online semistructured questionnaire was developed, with a consent form attached to it. The specific instruments which were included in the survey were job satisfaction scale, perceived stress scale (PSS), and abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results: PSS of Group A was 18.68 ± 4.248 and of Group B was 18.625 ± 4.082; P value: 0.931. There was no significant difference in the perceived stress score between the two groups, but perceived stress scores in both groups were significantly higher than average score. Average score is considered as 13. 44% in Group A had PSS 20 or above and 42% in Group B had PSS 20 or above; P = 0.775 and Chi-square 0.0816. Job satisfaction score in Group A was 36.97 ± 6.32 and Group B was 37.81 ± 4.99; P value: 0.346. In Group A, 22.12% had scores between 42 and 50 (indicates very high job satisfaction); 26.92% had scores between 39 and 41 (high job satisfaction); 36.54% had scores between 32 and 38 (average job satisfaction); 7.69% had scores between 27 and 31 (low job satisfaction); and 7.69% had scores between 10 and 26 (very low job satisfaction). In Group B, 31.25% had scores between 42 and 50 (indicates very high job satisfaction); 18.75% had scores between 39 and 41 (high job satisfaction); 37.5% had scores between 32 and 38 (average job satisfaction); and 12.5% had scores between 27 and 31 (low job satisfaction). PSS was negatively correlated with job satisfaction score in both groups with more negative correlation in Group A as compared to Group B (Group A – r value: −0.21069; Group B – r value: −0.08197); satisfaction with medicine scores was 12.96 ± 3.34; depersonalization scores: 5 ± 2.3; personal accomplishment scores: 12.096 ± 3.457; and emotional exhaustion scores: 6.66 ± 3.42. Conclusions: Doctors as well as non-medical staff perceived high stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, but they were mostly satisfied with their jobs and burnout scores were not alarming.


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